Partnership For Success (PFS) is a Cherokee Nation-funded grant which addresses the significant issues surrounding prescription drugs and their effects on the 12-25 year old population of Nowata County. This grant provides funding for community assessment and strategy development with the goal of reducing the number of accidental drug overdoses, decreasing the use of prescription narcotics and sedatives in Oklahoma, and providing training to non-medical personnel on the use of the overdose reversal medication Naloxone.

Prescription drug abuse is Oklahoma’s fastest growing drug problem, and anyone can be at risk of overdose if prescription drugs are not taken as direction and with a valid prescription. If you or a loved one need help with drug dependence or addiction in Oklahoma, call 211 for a treatment referral near you. If you suspect an opioid overdose, call 911 immediately.

Drug Use In Oklahoma:

  • Nearly 3,900 unintentional poisoning deaths in Oklahoma between 2007 and 2012
    • 4 out of 5 deaths involved at least one prescription drug
  • In 2012, Oklahoma had the 5th highest unintentional poisoning death rate in the nation
    • 18.6 deaths per 100,000 people
  • Adults aged 35-54 had the highest death rate of any age group for both prescription and non-prescription related overdoses
  • Men are more likely to die of an opioid-related overdose than women

Most Commonly Abused Prescription Drugs:

  • Opioids such as oxycodone and hydrocodone
    • Used to treat pain
    • Includes Oxycontin, Roxicodone, Vicodin, Lortab, Norco
  • Anti-anxiety medications & sedatives such as alprazolam and diazepam
    • Used to treat anxiety
    • Includes Xanax, Valium
  • Hypnotics such as zolpidem
    • Used to treat anxiety and sleep disorders
    • Includes Ambien
  • Stimulants such a methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, and amphetamine
    • Used to treat ADHD and certain sleep disorders
    • Includes Ritalin, Concerta, Adderall XR, Dexedrine

Signs/Symptoms of Prescription Drug Abuse:

  • Opioid painkillers:
    • Constipation
    • Nausea
    • Feeling high (euphoria)
    • Slowed breathing rate
    • Drowsiness
    • Confusion
    • Poor coordination
    • Increased pain with higher doses
    • Signs of opioid overdose include the “opioid overdose triad” of pinpoint pupils, unconsciousness, and respiratory depression
  • Sedatives/anti-anxiety medication:
    • Drowsiness
    • Confusion
    • Unsteady walking
    • Slurred speech
    • Poor concentration
    • Dizziness
    • Problems with memory
    • Slowed breathing
  • Stimulants:
    • Reduced appetite
    • Agitation
    • High body temperature
    • Insomnia
    • High blood pressure
    • Irregular heartbeat
    • Anxiety
    • Paranoia
  • Other signs of drug abuse:
    • Stealing, forging, or selling prescriptions
    • Taking higher doses than prescribed
    • Excessive mood swings or hostility
    • Poor decision-making
    • Increase or decrease in sleep
    • Appearing to be high, unusually energetic or revved up, or sedated
    • Continually “losing” prescriptions so more must be written
    • Seeking prescriptions from more than one doctor

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